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Stay on Track

Checklist for this Week, November 18, 2013


For freshmen

  • Exams are coming up; each assignment, exam, and project will probably carry a certain weight in your final grade. Ask your teacher what these weights will be, and study first for the parts that will count the most.
  • Some teachers offer study sheets and review sessions outside of the regular class period. Take advantage — all of these activities can only help you improve your grade.
  • Keep your materials organized and easy to find; become familiar with where to locate and review key information.
  • Make sure you are making notes in your daily planner. The information available in these tools is only valuable if it is maintained regularly.
  • Study in groups whenever possible. Group studying helps you gather different ideas about how to learn the materials, and it gives you other resources to assist with your studying.
  • Make a calendar that clearly shows timelines for tests and exams. Review regularly.

For juniors

  • Visit with your counselor now about your course load and selection for next semester. Check to make sure you are on track to complete your requirements for graduation. As you near completion, your options become more limited for course selection.
  • Plan your time well and study as much as possible. Cramming for a test is rarely helpful, and sometimes it can actually hurt your grade. Besides, you don't need the stress.
  • Set up a study group for your more challenging courses. Chances are, if you're having problems mastering material for a class, there are probably other students with the same experience.

For seniors

  • Visit with your counselor now about your course load and selection for next semester. Check to make sure you are on track to complete your requirements for graduation. As you near completion, your options become more limited for course selection.
  • If any of the college applications you have submitted require a midyear report, make sure you have provided the form to your counselor or school registrar to complete. This information is used to report your progress after your first semester — so don't slack off on your studies.
  • Set up a study group for your more challenging courses. Chances are, if you're having problems mastering material for a class, there are probably other students struggling through the material.

For parents

  • Encourage your child to find out what the grade requirements are for each class. Frequently, assignments, tests, and class participation all count toward the final grade. Make sure your child understands this and concentrates on class requirements appropriately.
  • If you have a freshman or sophomore, consider encouraging him or her to set up a study calendar that includes exam and major project dates and deadlines.
  • If your child hasn't set up a study location or time, encourage him or her to do so. Recognize and respect study times as "quiet time" in the household, and provide encouragement whenever possible.
  • Avoid scheduling doctor and dentist appointments that will conflict with study sessions.